Jobs of the Day: NPR Tech Reporter, Wine Journalist, Reuters Bureau Chief, Entertainment Blogger

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Want a new journalism job? Sure you do! We’ve been combing the interwebs today to provide you with new journalism and media opportunities. Today, we have some jobs for techies, entertainment junkies, and lovers of the good life. Whether you’re interested in heading up a news bureau or drinking wine for a living, we’ve got some sweet opportunities on our Jobs of the Day:

Reuters, Bureau Chief, U.S. Southeast & Caribbean – Miami
Reuters is looking for a superb writer and manager to run the Southeastern United States and Caribbean, one of the busiest regions in the world for general news stories that are of importance to clients across the asset classes. From covering hurricanes and earthquakes to space missions, Koran-burning pastors and international fraudsters, the southeast U.S. and Caribbean beat offers one of the most varied and busy files in Reuters Americas, including fast-breaking spot news and opportunities for “deep-dive” investigative stories. In “Sunshine State” Florida, huge wealth, high finance and financial fraud often go hand in hand and in recent years the territory has loomed large in some of the world’s biggest and most notorious fraud scandals — Bernard Madoff’s victims included many of his Palm Beach neighbors, while Texas billionaire Allen Stanford is accused of using Florida and the Caribbean island of Antigua as hubs for the $7 billion Ponzi scheme he was charged with operating. Florida is also a key political swing state in what is already shaping up to be a hard-fought 2012 U.S. presidential election. Miami’s varied file includes covering political developments and natural disasters in a string of Caribbean states from Cuba and to Trinidad and Haiti’s 2010 earthquake was Reuters Story of the Year. The bureau oversees the file from Cuba where the cautious reforms and advancing age of the leaders of the Cuban Revolution is setting up one of the most fascinating international political stories in decades.

 

Reporter/Correspondent, Business-National Desk

The National Desk is seeking a Reporter/Correspondent to cover technology from Silicon Valley. This is a high profile business reporting position that will focus on information technology, innovation and the Internet. The successful candidate will cover globally influential companies based in Silicon Valley and will report on the myriad ways technology affects the US economy and its citizens. The successful candidate will develop sources inside and outside of the industry and is expected to produce stories as well about privacy, social media, venture capital and cyber-security. A thorough knowledge of technology and high level reporting and storytelling skills are essential. Radio experience and a proven track record in covering technology are strongly preferred. The selected candidate will report on air for NPR shows and newscast segments, and online for NPR.org.

Wine Industry Journalist

Wines & Vines, a leading wine industry magazine based in San Rafael, Calif., seeks an experienced journalist and technical writer to fill a full-time staff writer position in our office. We need a self-starting, team-playing reporter who knows and loves the wine industry, to write business news, product news, lead our social media writing efforts, and most importantly research and write in-depth technical articles on winery and vineyard equipment and processes. For monthly print magazine, daily news website and digital editions.

The ideal candidate has a bachelor’s degree or more, at least five years of journalism experience, and a scientific/engineering bent as well as excellent writing skills. He or she has also spent enough time in vineyards, wineries or industry supplier companies to understand our target readers, who work in grape and wine production. The winning candidate enjoys learning more about winery technology, enology and viticulture.(via writerjobs)

Entertainment News Writer

A multimedia entertainment news website, Hollywire.com is seeking a dedicated, pop culture savvy writer to join our team!

Qualifications:
• Journalism Degree or background
• Knowledgeable of AP Style guidelines
• Proficient in spelling, grammar, and punctuation

Ideal Candidate:
• Previous writing experience
• Dedicated
• Must be a team player
• Must be willing to drive in the LA area to attend red carpet events to take pictures and collect sound bytes for editorial content
• Must be in-the-know about Young Hollywood and all aspects of the entertainment industry

Prolific Freelancer Thursday Bram on Pricing Infoproducts, Working with Subcontractors

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Freelance writer Thursday Bram has contributed to websites including CNET, GigaOM, and Lifehack. She’s also created a variety of information products like ebooks and online classes and recently launched an online membership site at EnhancedFreelance.

Ebyline chatted with Thursday about media trends and new opportunities for writers.

Ebyline: What are some of the limitations of the traditional hourly or per project freelance model where you’re working with clients? How can freelancers bust out of that model?

Thursday:
The biggest limitation, especially to charging hourly, is that every freelance writer has only 24 hours in every day — and if we try to work all of them, it tends to end poorly. At the very least, a lack of sleep makes for less than excellent work. There are certainly other limitations, as well, but that’s the limitation that I’ve run up against the most often. It means that the amount of money that can be made by someone that purely freelances is limited.

Breaking out of that hourly model is crucial. Charging per project is an important first step, because it means that you’ve got room to start exploring if there are time intensive parts of the work you do can be outsourced. I have a virtual assistant who can handle repetitive tasks, like tracking down email addresses for potential sources, freeing me up to do more actual writing. From there, it’s a question of what additional income sources you can think of that fit well with your specialties. That might mean subcontracting out work, creating ebooks or something entirely different.

When and why did you decide to start working with subcontractors? 

I’ve actually been working with one of army subcontractors for well over a year now. What sparked the idea to bring her on was a client who wanted me on a project where the budget was too low for me to actually take on. But I knew a writer who could handle the work with some editing and charged a rate that would allow me to get the posts written and still budget a little of my time for the necessary editing. It felt like a win all around.

Nowadays a lot of writers monetize their content by selling infoproducts but prices for those products are all over the map. What are your thoughts on pricing infoproducts?

Pricing can be tough, just because one group of buyers might be willing to pay a lot more than others. The first thing that I look at when I’m creating a new product is how much time I’m going to put into it. That’s in contrast to what some people will tell you (“look at the audience size” is pretty common advice). I want to know what I need to make for a project to make financial sense for me. From there, I’ll make a table of how many copies I need to sell at which price points for a total. Then I’ll run down the numbers to see what I think is realistic  There’s a bit of gut instinct at play, but you can usually get a good feel based on your research.

One of the dangers with infoproducts and content marketing is that you share too much and give away the farm for free or you don’t share enough and readers wonder if the product is all hype. Any thoughts on finding the right balance?

I’m happy to give away plenty of information in general. I blog all over the place and have given away plenty of free ebooks and the like. But I don’t generally do a lot of free information in connection with a specific product. I think that having built up my expertise is enough.

Another reason that I’m not scared to be forthcoming with free information is because much of what I write about (and sell in product form) is not some secret great truth. I learned most of it for free, by trial and error, reading everything in sight and bothering people who know more. What I’m really offering in a product is organization and guidance through all that information. And most people really do find that worth paying for.

I’ve seen a few other freelancer writers create membership communities as you’ve done. Do you think these communities are the new ebook or blog? Or is there another emerging trend you’re noticing?

I actually see live events being one of the big trends coming up. There have always been tons of forums and membership sites for freelancers (think about all those sites that offer guidelines for publications behind pay walls). I definitely can tell that there’s a lot of differences between the membership sites that have been started in the past few months. Mine really focuses on building up a business as a whole — marketing, additional income sources and the like. I’ve seen one that’s much more of a mentorship program and another that’s more geared towards honing writing abilities.

Why You Need a Writing Mentor and Where to Find One

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No matter where you are in your freelancing career, everyone needs a little help sometime. Finding a mentor can be a good way to break you out of your regular working routine and electrify your mind with new ideas and inspiration. Laura Spencer recently wrote a great post for Freelance Folder, which addresses the best ways to find a writing mentor, and why mentors matter in the first place.

 

 

Check out a handful of her mentoring tips:

Get industry-specific tips. If your mentor works in the same freelancing profession as you do, they may be able to help you identify specific tools and techniques that work well in your field and steer you away from those that are bad ideas.

Learn from secondhand experience. It’s great to learn from your mistakes, but it’s even better to avoid making the mistakes in the first place. In a nutshell, this is often what having a mentor can do for you. Your mentor can tip you off to methods and processes that really don’t work well.

Benefit from expanded network connections. Your mentor likely has a broader base of connections since they have been in business longer. For that reason, your mentor can introduce you to or point you towards individuals and fellow article writers who can really help you grow your business.

And Laura offered a few tips on how to find a mentor too:

Past employer/colleague. For those freelancers who have held a traditional job before becoming a freelancer, their past workplace may be the ideal place to find someone experienced in their field.

Professional association. You can also find experienced freelancers (and potential mentors) in professional associations and business networking groups.

Paid coach. Many experienced freelancers offer paid coaching or mentoring services. If you want to find a mentor who works in your specific niche, this may be the best way to do it.

For the rest of Laura’s great tips, check out her Freelance Folder post Finding a Mentor–A Freelancer’s Simple Success Secret.

Where did you find your mentor? How has your mentor helped you in your own freelancing career? Let us know in the Comments

How Freelance Journalists Can Use Facebook’s New ‘Subscribe’ Button

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When it comes to breaking news, Facebook has got nothin’ on Twitter. Twitter’s rapid fire interface, and news ticker feel makes it the perfect place to get up to the second updates on what’s happening in your world and beyond. But today, Facebook has launched their new “Subscribe” feature, which seems to merge the content control of Google+ with the fast pace updates of Twitter. The gauntlet has been thrown down. But will Facebook be a more effective tool for journalists?

From the Facebook overlords:

Facebook users can now visit another user’s profile and subscribe to receive the person’s public updates in their news feed, without being “friends.” The feature lets Facebook users broadcast public messages to subscribers, like Twitter does, while also keeping their private network of friends separate.

With the Subscribe button, we’re making it easier to do both. In the next few days, you’ll start seeing this button on friends’ and others’ profiles. You can use it to:

  1. Choose what you see from people in News Feed
  2. Hear from people, even if you’re not friends
  3. Let people hear from you, even if you’re not friends

Still wondering how this would work for journalists? Jeff Sonderman at the Poynter Institute provided 5 things journalists need to know about new Facebook subscription feature.
Here are a few highlights of Sonderman’s piece:

1. First, you have to opt-in. You must visit this Facebook page to enable subscriptions to your account. Only then can other Facebook users visit your profile and subscribe.

2. Many journalists may find they no longer need a separate Facebook Page. Pages had two primary advantages over profiles: People could subscribe to page updates (by liking them) without being your Facebook friend, and there was no limit to the number of fans you could have.

…There are two possible reasons you might want to keep your Facebook Page: You already have such a strong following there you don’t want to disrupt it, or you need to use the apps and extra tabs that Pages allow you to add.

3. Facebook continues to encourage publicness. By creating a distinct audience for public updates, Facebook is motivating users to share more things publicly.

People who have a lot of subscribers may feel pressure to share most things publicly, and just keep a few personal updates private for friends and family. If that happens, Facebook Search will become a more useful tool for journalists and others who want to search public posts like they do on Twitter.

4. Each subscriber controls how much they see from you. This could be a good thing or a bad thing for journalists and web content writers. But each person can choose to see all of your updates, most of your updates or only the “most important” as determined by Facebook.

5. Facebook is positioning itself as the social network for everything and everyone, by incorporating the most distinctive features of Twitter and Google+.

Now Facebook takes on Twitter with the new Subscribe button (there’s also a feature to send all your public Facebook posts to Twitter). And earlier this week Facebook announced new ways to build and share with lists of friends, similar to how Google+ circles work.

 

 

What do you think? Will you be using Facebook’s new subscribe button? Do you think it will help journalists? Let us know in the comments!

How to Track Your Freelance Writing Income More Effectively

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Keeping track of money may not be the most exciting part of freelance writing, but it’s still crucially important. In this video, we share a sample Excel spreadsheet and show step by step how I track income, deadlines, and more. If you don’t have a system yourself, Income Tracking Sheet and customize it to your needs. Have another strategy for tracking income? Leave a comment and tell us about it!

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