Jobs of the Day: Digital Producer APM, Health Reporter Wall St. Journal, Video Producer in Kenya

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From Wall Street to the streets of Kenya, today’s job posts go global. We have digital media jobs for American Public Media, as well as health and financial reporting gigs in the Big Apple. For those of you who want to break into foreign reporting, there are several openings at the Nation Media Group in Kenya. Ready for your adventure? This is it.

Here are Ebyline’s Jobs of the day:

Health Reporter – Wall Street Journal

The New York Health & Science group is looking for an experienced news hound to join its corporate reporting team, helping cover the pharmaceutical and medical-device industries. These industries are facing enormous challenges, including looming patent expirations, the need to find growth amid a tough regulatory environment, and increasing pressures to reduce health-care costs while better serving patient needs. The ideal candidate will have a proven ability to get inside companies and break news, and the vision to see events in a larger context and write compelling, enterprising stories that keep us ahead of the curve. The job also requires the ability to translate complex medical and scientific subjects for the lay reader. Prior experience with medicine and science isn’t required, but a fascination with the subject and willingness to learn is essential. Interested parties should contact Stefanie Ilgenfritz, Health & Science bureau chief.

Staff Writer – Daily Comet
Seeking staff writer to cover cops, fire, courts and related topics in Lafourche Parish, La.

We’re looking for someone with enterprise and talent to write both breaking news and in-depth stories. Qualified job applicants will have a strong hard-news background and the ability to dig for hard-hitting stories, root out corruption and other problems and write about solutions.

You must possess the ability to think critically and take on the tough stories while maintaining professionalism and compassion. A sense of humor is a must, as is the ability to learn how to spell names like Boudreaux and Thibodaux. For this beat, we’re looking for someone able to craft stories, not just on the mechanics of public safety and legal justice, but on the people and communities affected.

Feature writers need not apply.

Associate Digital Producer – American Public Media

The Associate Digital Producer is part of a group of Web producers & designers that serves the marketing, corporate communications & revenue-generating areas of the organization including Underwriting, Commerce, & Membership/Development.
At this point the position is temporary with undetermined end date. The position has flexible hours, usually ranging from 20 – 30 hours a week but occasionally more, especially during the fall & holiday seasons.
- Sets up & tracks email campaigns on external email provider systems
- Compiles emailings from provided materials
- Maintains & updates information on a variety of web sites
- Produces online ads within established guidelines
- Maintains presence in external social networking sites
- Checks work for meeting established HTML standards & browser compatibility requirements.
- Identifies & reports production problems & assists with solutions.
- Create digital assets — images & text
- Compile assets from various sources for digital distribution
- Assist in the production of special features & projects

St. Paul, MN

Financial Services Editor – Dow Jones Newswires

Dow Jones Newswires is seeking an experienced editor to manage a dedicated group of U.S. reporters covering the financial services industry . Candidates should have proven experience in real-time financial journalism, strong writing skills and a keen eye for finding news in the investment banks, commercial banks, insurance, hedge funds and consumer finance industries. Experience managing a dynamic group of journalists and article writers is desirable as is the ability to balance breaking news stories with big-picture thematic pieces. The team writes for Dow Jones Newswires as well as the online and print editions of The Wall Street Journal.

Applicants should attach a resume, cover letter and three to five clips to the application. The position is based in New York City.

Online Video Producer -Nation Media Group (Kenya)

These position falls vacant within the Editorial Department. The candidates should have good understanding of new media, proven writing, editing, and web production abilities and sound knowledge of current affairs. He/She should also be innovative, analytical and adaptable to fast-changing news and technology realities and work under tight deadlines.

Key responsibilities and duties:
-Gatekeeper for video standards for multimedia storytelling on web and mobile.
-Checking and correcting editorial products for facts, accuracy, taste, house- style, language use, clarity and balance to conform to NMG Editorial
Policy;
-Ensure NMG content is properly projected on digital platforms, including SEO.
-Ensuring timely publishing to digital platforms;
-Social media engagement.

Via Journalism Jobs, International Journalists’ Network

50 Journalists and Bloggers to Follow On Facebook ‘Subscribe’

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By now you’ve probably heard about Facebook’s new Subscribe button, which allows you to follow journalist and web content writers that you respect on Facebook. It essentially works like Twitter, feeding your information cravings with a healthy helping of news and views. But who do you subscribe to? Today, Facebook’s journalism program manager Vadim Lavrusik provided a jumping off point for “subscribe” newbies, and listed 50 journalists and bloggers who are available for subscriptions.

With the launch of Subscribe last week, we wanted to show an example of some journalists who are using Subscribe to enable readers and viewers to keep up with their public updates and also subscribe to sources they are interested in keeping up with.

To help you satiate your own media diet, we’ve published his list below so you can start subscribing right away!

To turn on Subscribe, go to https://www.facebook.com/about/subscribe.

  1. Ann Curry, TODAY Show/NBC News
  2. Brian Stelter, reporter at The New York Times
  3. Ayman Mohyeldin, NBC News, Egypt Correspondent
  4. Elizabeth Spiers, editor of The New York Observer
  5. Brian Storm, executive producer at MediaStorm
  6. Craig Kanalley, Huffington Post, senior traffic and trends editor
  7. Esther Vargas, editor at Peru21
  8. Pete Cashmore, CEO and founder of Mashable, CNN columnist
  9. Anthony De Rosa, Social Media Editor at Reuters
  10. Saul Hansell, Big News Editor at Huffington Post.
  11. Liz Gannes, AllThingsD reporter
  12. Jose Antonio Vargas, Pulitzer-prize winning journalist
  13. Robert Scoble, Scobleizer
  14. Nick Bilton, The New York Times reporter and lead technology writer
  15. Nick Denton, founder of Gawker Media
  16. Jenna Wortham, New York Times reporter
  17. Franz Strasser, video journalist at BBC News
  18. Om Malik, founder of GigaOmniMedia
  19. Jessica Vascellaro, Wall Street Journal repoter
  20. Jeff Jarvis, CUNY prof, writer
  21. Mathew Ingram, GigaOm writer
  22. MG Siegler, writer at TechCrunch
  23. Ben Parr, Editor at Large at Mashable
  24. Bilal Randere, Online Producer at Al Jazeera
  25. Laurie Segall, CNN Money producer
  26. Daniela Capistrano, Online Producer at “Countdown with Keith Olbermann”
  27. Mark Milian, reporter at CNN.com
  28. Jason Kincaid, TechCrunch
  29. Brian Ries, The Daily Beast social media editor
  30. Jenn Van Grove, senior reporter at Mashable
  31. Liz Heron, The New York Times, social media editor
  32. Jason DeRusha, WCCO reporter/anchor
  33. Walt Mossberg, AllThingsd columnist
  34. Amanda Zamora, Washington Post, social media & engagement editor
  35. Gregory Korte, reporter at USA Today
  36. Jen Lee Reeves, Interactive Director at KOMU
  37. Martin Beck, Los Angeles Times engagement editor
  38. P. Kim Bui, KPCC Social Media Editor
  39. Alexander B. Howard, Gov. 2.0 Washington Correspondent at O’Reilly Media: https://www.facebook.com/alexhoward
  40. Doug Crets, tech blogger at RWW
  41. Jeff Sonderman, Poynter writer
  42. Patrick Witty, international picture editor at TIME
  43. Tyson Evans, assistant editor of interactive news at The New York Times
  44. Mark W. Smith, web editor and columnist at Detroit Free Press.
  45. Irina Slutsky, reporter at Age Age
  46. Dan Ackerman, senior editor at CNET
  47. Paul Takahashi, multimedia journalist at the Las Vegas Sun
  48. Rosa Golijan, contributing writer at MSNBC
  49. Jim MacMillan, journalist in residence for War News Radio at Swarthmore College
  50. Dan Petty, social media editor at The Denver Post

Why Using a Smartphone as a Recorder is a Bad Idea

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One of the most common questions that I’m routinely asked by new journalists and investigative article writers is what recorder I use to tape interviews. I actually have two small portable Olympus digital recorders (WS-300M and an Olympus LS10) that I’ve been happy with. Both recorders have intuitive controls and good recording quality. I’ve even used the latter for broadcast interviews. Occasionally, I see journalists using iPhones as a recorder, which is fine if you’ve got nothing else. But the many disadvantages are not worth the convenience for the following reasons.

  • Using your smartphone as a recorder will diminish the short battery life that you already have to deal with. A dedicated recorder uses cheap AA and AAA batteries that you can more easily replace on the go.
  • Dedicated recorders typically have blinking recording lights that allow you to see from afar that they’re actually recording.  
  • Smartphones are harder to operate and monitor on the fly than a dedicated device. Try wading through menus on a touchscreen while in bright daylight and running to keep up with an interview subject. Most digital recorders have a single physical record button.
  • Using your smartphone at a press conference or roundtable means that you’re giving up your link to the world until the event is over. Not a good idea if you need to make or take a call, look something up on Google or snap a photo.
  • The biggest issue I’ve seen is how some smartphones can affect electronic devices while sharing a podium or press roundtable. Cell phones transmit regular signals to communicate with local cell towers and these pulses, especially when on GSM or EDGE mode, can be picked up by nearby digital recording devices and it is loud. Your colleagues will hate you for ruining their recordings.

A few tips:

If you do see a smartphone being used as a recorder, place your recorder as far away as possible from the device. But keep the recorder close to the speaker since distance increases how much background noise the microphone will pick up. If you insist on using your smartphone as a recorder, turn the cellular feature off. Inversely, keep your own smartphone away from your digital recorder while doing interviews. Switching the phone to “airplane mode” is the safest precaution that you can take in both instances.

 

 

How Freelance Journalists Can Find Sources Through Better Online Searches

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Nowadays, many journalists and investigative content writers do their research online instead of combing through the stacks at a library. However, the volume of online information makes it tricky to find what you need and filter out resources of questionable credibility. Here is our first Ebyline freelancer education video to highlight  some strategies to help you improve search results and streamline your research.

What are your tips for using online searches effectively? Let us know in the comments!

How the Economic Downturn Will Affect the News Business

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Financial meltdown! It’s the headline blaring across newspapers, blogs, and media outlets around the world. The economic turmoil has many people–from business execs to everyday citizens– shaking in their proverbial boots. But how will the frenzied market affect the news business and the people who work in it? Author and news analyst Ken Doctor has provided his thoughts on how the financial crisis will affect the media world. In “The Newsonomics of the Next Recession” for Nieman Labs he writes: “The next recession, though, we thought might come in 2014 or later — after the news industry had somehow gotten its digital transition act together and found some stable going-forward business model. Now, it appears that hope may have been an illusion. Newspaper turnaround artists plan, and the gods of finance laugh.”

For journalists and freelance writers keep up with the evolution of the news game, we have a few predictions and thoughts by Doctor on what he thinks will happen to “newspaper revenues, budgets and the companies themselves.”

The digital transition is still in its early stages. There’s a lot of transformation underway at newspaper companies. They’re moving away from just selling space to becoming regional digital agencies selling numerous products, to modeling digital subscriptions, to finding mobile revenue streams and more. Today’s conventional wisdom: It’s going to be a digital news world sooner rather than later, and we’ve got to move our businesses there fast as we can, holding on to as much print revenue as possible we transition. Problem: We’re still at the beginning of the transition. No major publisher is driving more than 20 percent of total revenue from digital. In fact, publishers are playing a straddle game — just as the earth underneath is cracking, a dangerous position.

Consolidation of newspaper properties may gain steamMedia concentration is a logical consequence of economic stress. Those screws just got tighter, and we’re going to see added pressures to consolidate, driven behind the scenes by private equity owners. (Those owners, of course, had hoped to force the digital transition — Exhibit A: Journal Register — and then sell the properties before the next recession.) If revenue growth is going to be harder to find, then the only alternative path to finding any black ink is to cut costs, and roll-up is one big way forward. Of course, we can expect still more operational cutting, including newsroom staff, as all companies once again deal with the specter of ongoing unprofitability. They know their value proposition — offering less deep and broad content is not what you want to do when you’re selling readers on a brand’s all-access reach — is already sorely tested by offering less at higher prices.

Investment in digital-only news production will be tested. It’s not just newspaper publishers; anyone seeing new opportunity in new content production has got to be worried. Unless your name is Bloomberg, another recession sends a big chill down your spine. Let’s take Tim Armstrong’s various pushes, for example. AOL, its investor confidence re-shaken this week, is going to have a harder time staying the course with Patch — at best a longer-term investment. Instead, look for more aggregation models to emerge (like AOL’s new tablet “Editions”). Aggregating other people’s stuff is a whole lot cheaper than originating content, and everyone’s going to be busy re-applying that lesson of Web 101.

For more, read his piece at Neiman Lab.

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