50 Journalists and Bloggers to Follow On Facebook ‘Subscribe’

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By now you’ve probably heard about Facebook’s new Subscribe button, which allows you to follow journalist and web content writers that you respect on Facebook. It essentially works like Twitter, feeding your information cravings with a healthy helping of news and views. But who do you subscribe to? Today, Facebook’s journalism program manager Vadim Lavrusik provided a jumping off point for “subscribe” newbies, and listed 50 journalists and bloggers who are available for subscriptions.

With the launch of Subscribe last week, we wanted to show an example of some journalists who are using Subscribe to enable readers and viewers to keep up with their public updates and also subscribe to sources they are interested in keeping up with.

To help you satiate your own media diet, we’ve published his list below so you can start subscribing right away!

To turn on Subscribe, go to https://www.facebook.com/about/subscribe.

  1. Ann Curry, TODAY Show/NBC News
  2. Brian Stelter, reporter at The New York Times
  3. Ayman Mohyeldin, NBC News, Egypt Correspondent
  4. Elizabeth Spiers, editor of The New York Observer
  5. Brian Storm, executive producer at MediaStorm
  6. Craig Kanalley, Huffington Post, senior traffic and trends editor
  7. Esther Vargas, editor at Peru21
  8. Pete Cashmore, CEO and founder of Mashable, CNN columnist
  9. Anthony De Rosa, Social Media Editor at Reuters
  10. Saul Hansell, Big News Editor at Huffington Post.
  11. Liz Gannes, AllThingsD reporter
  12. Jose Antonio Vargas, Pulitzer-prize winning journalist
  13. Robert Scoble, Scobleizer
  14. Nick Bilton, The New York Times reporter and lead technology writer
  15. Nick Denton, founder of Gawker Media
  16. Jenna Wortham, New York Times reporter
  17. Franz Strasser, video journalist at BBC News
  18. Om Malik, founder of GigaOmniMedia
  19. Jessica Vascellaro, Wall Street Journal repoter
  20. Jeff Jarvis, CUNY prof, writer
  21. Mathew Ingram, GigaOm writer
  22. MG Siegler, writer at TechCrunch
  23. Ben Parr, Editor at Large at Mashable
  24. Bilal Randere, Online Producer at Al Jazeera
  25. Laurie Segall, CNN Money producer
  26. Daniela Capistrano, Online Producer at “Countdown with Keith Olbermann”
  27. Mark Milian, reporter at CNN.com
  28. Jason Kincaid, TechCrunch
  29. Brian Ries, The Daily Beast social media editor
  30. Jenn Van Grove, senior reporter at Mashable
  31. Liz Heron, The New York Times, social media editor
  32. Jason DeRusha, WCCO reporter/anchor
  33. Walt Mossberg, AllThingsd columnist
  34. Amanda Zamora, Washington Post, social media & engagement editor
  35. Gregory Korte, reporter at USA Today
  36. Jen Lee Reeves, Interactive Director at KOMU
  37. Martin Beck, Los Angeles Times engagement editor
  38. P. Kim Bui, KPCC Social Media Editor
  39. Alexander B. Howard, Gov. 2.0 Washington Correspondent at O’Reilly Media: https://www.facebook.com/alexhoward
  40. Doug Crets, tech blogger at RWW
  41. Jeff Sonderman, Poynter writer
  42. Patrick Witty, international picture editor at TIME
  43. Tyson Evans, assistant editor of interactive news at The New York Times
  44. Mark W. Smith, web editor and columnist at Detroit Free Press.
  45. Irina Slutsky, reporter at Age Age
  46. Dan Ackerman, senior editor at CNET
  47. Paul Takahashi, multimedia journalist at the Las Vegas Sun
  48. Rosa Golijan, contributing writer at MSNBC
  49. Jim MacMillan, journalist in residence for War News Radio at Swarthmore College
  50. Dan Petty, social media editor at The Denver Post

How Freelance Journalists Can Use Facebook’s New ‘Subscribe’ Button

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When it comes to breaking news, Facebook has got nothin’ on Twitter. Twitter’s rapid fire interface, and news ticker feel makes it the perfect place to get up to the second updates on what’s happening in your world and beyond. But today, Facebook has launched their new “Subscribe” feature, which seems to merge the content control of Google+ with the fast pace updates of Twitter. The gauntlet has been thrown down. But will Facebook be a more effective tool for journalists?

From the Facebook overlords:

Facebook users can now visit another user’s profile and subscribe to receive the person’s public updates in their news feed, without being “friends.” The feature lets Facebook users broadcast public messages to subscribers, like Twitter does, while also keeping their private network of friends separate.

With the Subscribe button, we’re making it easier to do both. In the next few days, you’ll start seeing this button on friends’ and others’ profiles. You can use it to:

  1. Choose what you see from people in News Feed
  2. Hear from people, even if you’re not friends
  3. Let people hear from you, even if you’re not friends

Still wondering how this would work for journalists? Jeff Sonderman at the Poynter Institute provided 5 things journalists need to know about new Facebook subscription feature.
Here are a few highlights of Sonderman’s piece:

1. First, you have to opt-in. You must visit this Facebook page to enable subscriptions to your account. Only then can other Facebook users visit your profile and subscribe.

2. Many journalists may find they no longer need a separate Facebook Page. Pages had two primary advantages over profiles: People could subscribe to page updates (by liking them) without being your Facebook friend, and there was no limit to the number of fans you could have.

…There are two possible reasons you might want to keep your Facebook Page: You already have such a strong following there you don’t want to disrupt it, or you need to use the apps and extra tabs that Pages allow you to add.

3. Facebook continues to encourage publicness. By creating a distinct audience for public updates, Facebook is motivating users to share more things publicly.

People who have a lot of subscribers may feel pressure to share most things publicly, and just keep a few personal updates private for friends and family. If that happens, Facebook Search will become a more useful tool for journalists and others who want to search public posts like they do on Twitter.

4. Each subscriber controls how much they see from you. This could be a good thing or a bad thing for journalists and web content writers. But each person can choose to see all of your updates, most of your updates or only the “most important” as determined by Facebook.

5. Facebook is positioning itself as the social network for everything and everyone, by incorporating the most distinctive features of Twitter and Google+.

Now Facebook takes on Twitter with the new Subscribe button (there’s also a feature to send all your public Facebook posts to Twitter). And earlier this week Facebook announced new ways to build and share with lists of friends, similar to how Google+ circles work.

 

 

What do you think? Will you be using Facebook’s new subscribe button? Do you think it will help journalists? Let us know in the comments!

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