http://ebyline.biz/2011/03/should-we-tip-writers-micropayment-sites-say-yes/flattr-new-wikileaks-facilitator-funding/" rel="attachment wp-att-377For today’s mix of journalism and media news, we have a humorous insight on the New York Time’s headline strategies, a theory of how micropayment site Flattr could succeed at getting bloggers money, and a report on the Audit Bureau … "/>

What Are the Four Types of NYT Headlines? Is Twitter an Overrated Tool for Journalists? Does Flattr + Twitter = Money?

For today’s mix of journalism and media news, we have a humorous insight on the New York Time’s headline strategies, a theory of how micropayment site Flattr could succeed at getting bloggers money, and a report on the Audit Bureau of Circulations.

It’s all the news fit to blog at Ebyline’s Daily Dose.

The Four Kinds of NYT Headlines

“While you can count on every HuffPost headline starting with WATCH or PHOTOS and every NY Post screamer being a pun your grandfather would have found hilarious, the Times has its own headline ruts that seem to have gotten deeper over the years. Here are the four most common kinds…”

Can Flattr Plus Twitter Make Micropayments a Reality?

“Flattr, the micropayment startup founded by Peter Sunde — one of the co-founders of the notorious Swedish file-sharing site The Pirate Bay — said Monday it’s preparing to launch a new feature that will combine its payment system with Twitter, and allow any Flattr user to send money to someone via their Twitter name. Could this help launch a “tip jar” system that actually works on a large scale? If it does, then Sunde and Flattr could transform the online content industry in much the same way The Pirate Bay disrupted it, but for the better. If it doesn’t, then Flattr will be the latest to join a vast and star-studded cemetery of failed micropayment startups.”

Let’s hold off on that Pulitzer for Twitter

“Twitter is many things. It is a neighborhood stoop for people to gossip. It is an outlet for movie studios, TV networks, athletes and actors to promote themselves. It is a platform for journalists, including this one, to get their stories out to the masses.

What Twitter is not, is a news organization. It does not employ reporters or article writing services. It does not have news bureaus around the world. Maybe one day it will, but for now it is a global bulletin board. That’s why it is so frustrating when people, particularly veteran journalists give Twitter itself credit for breaking big stories.”

Associated Press files information request for photos of raid on bin Laden

“The Associated Press (AP) has filed a Freedom of Information Act request for all of the photos and videos taken during the raid that led to Osama bin Laden’s death, according to the National Press Photographers Association.

The Obama administration previously announced that it will not publicly release the photos of bin Laden’s body.

According to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), the government has 20 days to respond to the AP’s request. If the request is denied, the AP can take the matter to court.”

The newsonomics of the new ABCs of journalism

“This week brought us the long-worked-on new counting metrics for American daily newspaper journalism.

ABC, the Audit Bureau of Circulations, has long provided The Number.

The Number — really The Numbers, a daily number and a Sunday number — have been the reader numbers dailies measured themselves by, twice a year, spring and fall. Who’s up, who’s down, who’s number one — it’s really a horse-race number, simple to report by the publishers and simple to report by those covering the industry…”

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